Posts Tagged ‘fine art’

Wynyard Quarter Exhibition (part 2)

02/09/2013

In my post of 2 August 2013, I talked about the exhibition at and about the Wynyard Quarter. The show has now closed, and I am happy to post some images of the work inside the blue container.

A Second Wind

Photos from my book “A Second Wind”, about the coal fired steam tug “The Daldy”, which was also exhibited.

Wynyard Quarter

The two photos on the left were taken by me in the fast-changing Wynyard Quarter. For the first one I was standing on top of one of the old silos and I spotted a young girl holding balloons and wearing a helmet, which seemed quite peculiar. The one next to it is my impression of “The Cloud”, a multi-purpose event venue built in 2011. The two photos on the right were taken by Ruth Ames also in the Wynyard Quarter.

Ruth Ames

These three images are also work by Ruth Ames, who documented the changes happening in Daldy Street.

Sonya Roussina

“Cynthia” is a series by Sonya Roussina, which shows Cynthia, who is a regular visitor to the Wynyard Quarter piano.

Wynyard Quarter Exhibition

Great to see people enjoying our work! For a better look at the images, please visit my website.

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Wynyard Quarter Exhibition

02/08/2013

Entering and participating in the Waterfront Auckland Photography competition has resulted in a chance to exhibit my work alongside two other participants: Ruth Ames and Sonya Roussina. The Wynyard Quarter is a fast developing area on the Auckland Waterfront and with my interest in documentary photography and combining the present with the past, this is a perfect area for a project. With the help of a very kind man’s historical photographs I created a book called: A Second Wind. It features images of the steam tug “William C. Daldy” (The Daldy in short). The Daldy retired in 1977 after 41 years of service as one of the last coal fired tugs in the world. Now The Daldy operates as a working museum, see The Daldy for more information. Apart from documentary images, we also entered a few standalone images.

The official opening is today and the show is on until 19 August 2013. It was an interesting process setting it all up in a container! For more info please click on: Waterfront News. More images to follow soon.

Wynyard Quarter

Kröller-Müller Museum Sculpture Park

20/07/2013

Famous for its extensive collection of Vincent van Gogh’s works, the Kröller-Müller Museum also has an impressive Sculpture Park. I was amazed and inspired by it and this and following posts show some of my favourite works.

Aristide Maillol, L'Air, 1939/1962

Aristide Maillol, L’Air, 1939/1962

I can look at this stunning sculpture again and again, it stays fascinating from whichever angle you look at it. Maillol’s muse Dina Vierny was his model and a woman with an interesting history, as you can read in this article by William Grimes in the New York Times, dated 26 January 2009: Dina Vierny, Artist’s Muse, dies at 89

George Minne, Havenarbeider, 1911

George Minne, Havenarbeider, 1911

A Havenarbeider is a Docker. The remarkable face would have been enough, but would have resulted in a less striking sculpture. The half cut-off body adds to the strenght of this piece. George Minne was a Belgian artist and you can find more information about him on
The J. Paul Getty Museum site:
http://www.getty.edu/art/gettyguide/artMakerDetails?maker=3627.

Opening Night “Connection”

17/06/2013

A lot of people visited the opening of group exhibition “Connection”. It was a great evening, and at the end of the night I left with a big, beautiful bunch of flowers. Our hard work has paid off, and who knows we might be back next year at the Auckland Festival of Photography!

Connection1

Connection
Connection2

Connection – Photography Festival Exhibition

24/05/2013

The collaborative exhibition Connection will open on Tuesday, 4 June 2013 from 6-9pm  in the Ironbank in Karangahape Road, Auckland.

Myself and five other photographic artists: Ruth Ames, Sheryl Campbell, Delena Nathuran, Sonya Roussina and Sue Wiggins, will show individual works, including medium format film, mixed media, video, and fine art print.

The exhibition is part of the Auckland Photography Festival and our opening is part of the Festival’s Circuit night, where 11 other galleries are also open, and vans are available to drive people to and from the galleries.

Connection - Exhibition Auckland Photography Festival

Full Basket exhibition

19/09/2012

The opening night of the Full Basket exhibition was a big success and has received great feedback! The show is on until Friday, 21 September, at Unitec Mt Albert, Auckland in the Te Po Gallery in Building One.

Afloat

Bertie Plaatsman – Afloat – 2012

Early arrivals

Full Basket

Full Basket

10/09/2012

Exhibition coming up! I had a sneak preview this morning and it looks like it is going to be an exciting show! My image has been used as part of the advertising, and another image by me will be presented in the exhibition. There will be a wide range of work by a wide range of photographers, hence the name “Full Basket”.

Framed

15/06/2012




Chris Ofili

07/05/2010

A religious context can be considered in the analysis of the work for Ofili. His Catholic upbringing is still an interest that influences his work. In an interview with Thelma Golden, he says: “I just make things with subjects that come from me or address me, and one of the many things I am fascinated by is religion and the complexities of having religious thoughts and drive…”

Source: Ofili, Chris. “Within Reach 15 June to 2 November 2003 at the British Pavilion, 50th Venice Biennale”. “Volume I Words.” London: Victoria Miro Gallery, 2003.

 

 

Source photograph: Ofili, Chris. “Within Reach 15 June to 2 November 2003 at the British Pavilion, 50th Venice Biennale”. “Volume II Works.” London: Victoria Miro Gallery, 2003.

The subject matter in the exhibition “Within Reach” for the 50th Venice Biennale is love in paradise, black culture and racial issues. Ofili uses elephant dung to incorporate his connection with Africa into his work. The paintings depict a black couple, a man and a woman, in paradise.  Paradise, because he uses lush foliage and a star shaped moon. The couple is clearly in love as they are hugging and kissing each other. Ofili is also hinting that there could be trouble in paradise as in “AFRO LOVE AND ENVY” (2002-2003) he painted a snake. With his fascination by religion in mind, one could consider that the couple is related to Adam and Eve.

I chose the Youtube video (see link below) about “The Upper Room” exhibition because Ofili himself talks about religion and how it is an important part of existing and art history, and interesting for him to try to grapple with it in a painted way. In other words how to transfer and express it into his paintings.  There are 13 paintings in “The Upper Room” exhibition, twelve paintings are the same size and the thirteenth is larger, and it is widely accepted that this suggests Christ and his Apostles.

In the video Ofili also states that he is interested in creating an atmosphere for the viewers to be able to feel immersed in the paintings. Therefore it is important for him to incorporate the exhibition space into the exhibition with the aim of enhancing the experience of the viewer.

In the Youtube video of 2 March 2010 below you see London based Grime musician (mc) Tinie Tempah visiting Chris Ofili’s exhibition in the Tate Gallery. If you do not know what Grime music is go to: http://www.ehow.com/about_5877221_mark-copyright-laws.html. Tempah talks about how the work of Chris Ofili inspires him and how doing research is an important part of the process of making and understanding art.

When he views “The Upper Room” paintings he compares the process of making a painting to the process of making a song and the similarity of the methodology between the two, as both processes consist of the use of layers.

From 3.17 to 3.22 you see a glimpse of two paintings that were part of the “Within Reach” exhibition that my essay is about. The painted elephant dung in particularly is clearly visible. At the end of the video he talks about his appreciation of art and what is special about art. I like this video because a connection is made between two different expressions of art and to see how someone else appreciates, is affected and inspired by Chris Ofili’s art.

The subject matter in this exhibition is love in paradise, black culture and racial issues. Ofili uses elephant dung to incorporate his connection with Africa into his work. The paintings depict a black couple, a man and a woman, in paradise.  Paradise, because he uses lush foliage and a star shaped sun or moon. The couple is clearly in love as they are hugging and kissing each other. Ofili is also hinting that there could be trouble in paradise as in “AFRO LOVE AND ENVY” (2002-2003) he painted a snake (see figure 1) and in “AFRO RED WEB” (2002-2003) a spider’s web (see figure 2). With his fascination by religion in mind, one could consider that the couple is related to Adam and Eve.

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