Archive for the ‘My favourite artists/designers’ Category

Henri Cartier-Bresson

06/06/2010

Henri Cartier-Bresson was a French photographer who lived from 22 August 1908 until 3 August 2004. He was one of the founders of modern photojournalism. He has taken photographs all over the world, but for this exhibition I have chosen two of his photos taken in France.

Bresson’s name was mentioned in the film: “Annie Leibovitz Life through a Lens”, where she says that Bresson took photos in a way that was never done before. They were very relaxed and fluid, because of his method to use of a small camera.

Hyères – 1932

The photo Hyères shows flowing lines and symmetry in a street landscape as well as a cyclist, which makes the photo more interesting. I ask myself, where is this man going in a hurry? Is he a police officer? The form of the photo is also an example of good framing and great composition, as only what is necessary is portrayed.

Cartier-Bresson – Sidewalk Café Boulevard Diderot – Paris – no date

I enjoy the atmosphere that is present in cafes and taking photos of the interiors and sometimes of the people visiting. I have included the photo of the couple kissing as this is a wonderful moment in time and great timing by Cartier-Bresson. He pressed the button right on time, with the dog looking at the couple. You cannot ask or wait for these moments, they are a gift. The content of the photo is love. The form is again an example of good framing, not showing the man’s whole left leg and the woman’s chair makes the photo more interesting. The dog looking up at the kissing couple also adds greatly to the atmosphere of the scene.

Bertie Plaatsman – Girl in Café – Berlin 2009

The similarity with Cartier-Bresson’s photo of the couple and this photo is  the café setting as well as the great timing. The girl has just taken her eyes of her book and has a gaze, which makes me wonder what she is thinking about. The darker background of the photo makes the girl with the whiter tones of her clothes, bag and table stand out.

Thank you and Summary

06/06/2010

This exhibition coincides with the “Auckland festival of Photography 2010” and on the first page of the festival booklet it shows the festival message. It is a quote by Henri Cartier-Bresson: “Photographers deal in things which are continually vanishing and when they have vanished there is no contrivance on earth which can make them come back again.” This sums up my interest in documentary photography, and it is very appropriate for this exhibition.

Thank you for visiting the exhibition. I hope you have found it enjoyable and insightful. You are welcome to leave any feedback. It will be much appreciated.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Author unknown. “Brassaï: The Eye of Paris to open at the J. Paul Getty Museum April 13 – July 3, 1999”. 6 April 1999. 3 June 2010. The Getty.
http://getty.museum/news/press/exhibit/brassai.html

Jeffries, Stuart. “The dark lord”. 6 February 2001. 5 June 2010. The Guardian.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2001/feb/06/artsfeatures

Author unknown. “National Gallery of Art presents: Brassaï: The eye of Paris, “First major U.S. retrospective of the celebrated photographer”. 12 October 1999. 5 June 2010. National Gallery of Art, Maryland. http://www.nga.gov/press/exh/133/index.shtm

http://www.all-art.org/art_20th_century/brassai1.html

Stettner, Louis.  n.d. 4 June 2010. http://www.loustettner.com

Bishop, Bob. “Louis Stettner, New York-Paris”. n.d. 3 June 2010. ParisVoice.
http://www.parisvoice.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=587&Itemid=33

Dowell, William T.  “Louis Stettner Sees the Extraordinary in the Ordinary”. 4 June 2010. 6 June 2010. The Essential Edge Geneva.
http://www.essentialgeneva.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=733:stettner&catid=224:art-reviews&Itemid=173

Author unknown. Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson.  n.d. 6 June 2010 http://www.henricartierbresson.org/pres/home_en.htm

Author unknown. “Henri Cartier-Bresson”. n.d. 6 June 2010. Nouvelles Images.
http://www.nouvellesimages.com/Henri-Cartier-Bresson_id~artistes_aut~402151

Henly, Jon. “Photographer who turned a hobby into an art form”. 5 August 2004. 6 June 2010. The Guardian.  http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2004/aug/05/pressandpublishing.henricartierbresson

http://karinamargary.files.wordpress.com/2009/10/henri-cartier-bresson131.jpg

http://travel67.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/henri-cartier-bresson.jpg

http://www.photoquotes.com/

Poirier, Diane Elisabeth. “Brassaï an illustrated biography”. Paris Éditions Flammarion. 2005.

Stettner, Louis. “Wisdom Cries Out in the Streets”.  n.d.

Cartier-Bresson, Henri. “The mind’s eye. Writings on photography and photographers”. Aperture Foundation, Inc. 1999.

Chris Ofili

07/05/2010

A religious context can be considered in the analysis of the work for Ofili. His Catholic upbringing is still an interest that influences his work. In an interview with Thelma Golden, he says: “I just make things with subjects that come from me or address me, and one of the many things I am fascinated by is religion and the complexities of having religious thoughts and drive…”

Source: Ofili, Chris. “Within Reach 15 June to 2 November 2003 at the British Pavilion, 50th Venice Biennale”. “Volume I Words.” London: Victoria Miro Gallery, 2003.

 

 

Source photograph: Ofili, Chris. “Within Reach 15 June to 2 November 2003 at the British Pavilion, 50th Venice Biennale”. “Volume II Works.” London: Victoria Miro Gallery, 2003.

The subject matter in the exhibition “Within Reach” for the 50th Venice Biennale is love in paradise, black culture and racial issues. Ofili uses elephant dung to incorporate his connection with Africa into his work. The paintings depict a black couple, a man and a woman, in paradise.  Paradise, because he uses lush foliage and a star shaped moon. The couple is clearly in love as they are hugging and kissing each other. Ofili is also hinting that there could be trouble in paradise as in “AFRO LOVE AND ENVY” (2002-2003) he painted a snake. With his fascination by religion in mind, one could consider that the couple is related to Adam and Eve.

I chose the Youtube video (see link below) about “The Upper Room” exhibition because Ofili himself talks about religion and how it is an important part of existing and art history, and interesting for him to try to grapple with it in a painted way. In other words how to transfer and express it into his paintings.  There are 13 paintings in “The Upper Room” exhibition, twelve paintings are the same size and the thirteenth is larger, and it is widely accepted that this suggests Christ and his Apostles.

In the video Ofili also states that he is interested in creating an atmosphere for the viewers to be able to feel immersed in the paintings. Therefore it is important for him to incorporate the exhibition space into the exhibition with the aim of enhancing the experience of the viewer.

In the Youtube video of 2 March 2010 below you see London based Grime musician (mc) Tinie Tempah visiting Chris Ofili’s exhibition in the Tate Gallery. If you do not know what Grime music is go to: http://www.ehow.com/about_5877221_mark-copyright-laws.html. Tempah talks about how the work of Chris Ofili inspires him and how doing research is an important part of the process of making and understanding art.

When he views “The Upper Room” paintings he compares the process of making a painting to the process of making a song and the similarity of the methodology between the two, as both processes consist of the use of layers.

From 3.17 to 3.22 you see a glimpse of two paintings that were part of the “Within Reach” exhibition that my essay is about. The painted elephant dung in particularly is clearly visible. At the end of the video he talks about his appreciation of art and what is special about art. I like this video because a connection is made between two different expressions of art and to see how someone else appreciates, is affected and inspired by Chris Ofili’s art.

The subject matter in this exhibition is love in paradise, black culture and racial issues. Ofili uses elephant dung to incorporate his connection with Africa into his work. The paintings depict a black couple, a man and a woman, in paradise.  Paradise, because he uses lush foliage and a star shaped sun or moon. The couple is clearly in love as they are hugging and kissing each other. Ofili is also hinting that there could be trouble in paradise as in “AFRO LOVE AND ENVY” (2002-2003) he painted a snake (see figure 1) and in “AFRO RED WEB” (2002-2003) a spider’s web (see figure 2). With his fascination by religion in mind, one could consider that the couple is related to Adam and Eve.

“Manifesto”

16/04/2010

“Begin with ideas
Embrace chance
Celebrate coincidence
Ad-lib and make things up
Eliminate superfluous elements
Subvert expectation
Make something difficult look easy
Be first or last
Believe complex ideas can produce simple things
Trust the process
Allow concepts to determine form
Reduce material and production to their essence
Sustain the integrity of an idea
Propose honesty as a solution”

By: artist and designer Daniel Eatock
From: http://www.eatock.com/project/daniel-eatock/

I chose this poem because I find it inspiring.
Daniel Eatock (1975) lives and works in England. I find his work humorous and original. He is very observant of things in “every day life” that usually go unnoticed, let alone get explored, and this inspires him to make art and projects of it.

An example of this is his project “Camera straps” (which is only “every day life” for people who photograph) where he has invited people to photograph the strap attached to their camera (like a dog chasing its own tail) and email it to him. He will then publish the photo on his website: www.danieleatock.com/project/camera-straps/. We all know how this accidentally happens sometimes , you get your camera out and have a nice shot in your frame and then ….. the strap is in there too!

His “Display Book Shelf” maybe an idea for the Product Design students who are working on producing a shelf at the moment:


MDF shelf, 6 feet long, 1 foot wide, 3/4 inch thick, resting on two metal brackets displaying books borrowed from Belk Library. The shelf sags under the weight of its contents in a graceful arc, the top edges of all the books are perfectly flush as a result of a conscious selection of volumes chosen to accommodate (or compensate for) the arc of the sagging shelf.

Source: http://www.eatock.com/projects/display-book-shelf/


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